The organization of classical satellite DNAs in human chromosomes: an approach using AluI and TaqI restriction endonucleases

Abstract

Human classical satellite DNAs were used as probes to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) of AluI/TaqI attack in situ on specific centromeric areas. The biochemical results obtained show that the majority of such highly repetitive DNAs are not solubilized from chromosomes, in spite of a cleavage pattern identical to that shown in naked genomic DNA digested with the same enzymes. Moreover, when digestion in situ with restriction enzymes precedes in situ hybridization, it is possible to observe an increased signal in the centromeres of some chromosomes as compared to that shown in standard undigested chromosomes and, on the other hand, hybridization labelling in centromeres which are difficult to detect by in situ hybridization using standard undigested chromosomes. Lastly, our results show that centromeric heterochromatin is not a homogeneous class in regard to organizational structure.

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Published
2009-06-26
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Original Papers
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How to Cite
Nieddu, M., Pichiri, G., Diaz, G., & Mezzanotte, R. (2009). The organization of classical satellite DNAs in human chromosomes: an approach using AluI and TaqI restriction endonucleases. European Journal of Histochemistry, 47(3), 209-214. https://doi.org/10.4081/829