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Autophagic degradation of farnesylated prelamin A as a therapeutic approach to lamin-linked progeria

V. Cenni, C. Capanni, M. Columbaro, M. Ortolani, M.R. D'Apice, G. Novelli, M. Fini, S. Marmiroli, E. Scarano, N.M. Maraldi, S. Squarzoni, S. Prencipe, G. Lattanzi
  • V. Cenni
    National Research Council of Italy, Italy
  • C. Capanni
    National Research Council of Italy, Italy
  • M. Columbaro
    Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Italy
  • M. Ortolani
    National Research Council of Italy, Italy
  • M.R. D'Apice
    University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
  • G. Novelli
    University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
  • M. Fini
    Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute and BITTA, RIT, IOR, Italy
  • S. Marmiroli
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy
  • E. Scarano
    S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy
  • N.M. Maraldi
    Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Italy
  • S. Squarzoni
    National Research Council of Italy, Italy
  • S. Prencipe
    Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute and BITTA, RIT, IOR, Italy

Abstract

Farnesylated prelamin A is a processing intermediate produced in the lamin A maturation pathway. Accumulation of a truncated farnesylated prelamin A form, called progerin, is a hallmark of the severe premature ageing syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Progerin elicits toxic effects in cells, leading to chromatin damage and cellular senescence and ultimately causes skin and endothelial defects, bone resorption, lipodystrophy and accelerated ageing. Knowledge of the mechanism underlying prelamin A turnover is critical for the development of clinically effective protein inhibitors that can avoid accumulation to toxic levels without impairing lamin A/C expression, which is essential for normal biological functions. Little is known about specific molecules that may target farnesylated prelamin A to elicit protein degradation. Here, we report the discovery of rapamycin as a novel inhibitor of progerin, which dramatically and selectively decreases protein levels through a mechanism involving autophagic degradation. Rapamycin treatment of progeria cells lowers progerin, as well as wild-type prelamin A levels, and rescues the chromatin phenotype of cultured fibroblasts, including histone methylation status and BAF and LAP2alpha distribution patterns. Importantly, rapamycin treatment does not affect lamin C protein levels, but increases the relative expression of the prelamin A endoprotease ZMPSTE24. Thus, rapamycin, an antibiotic belonging to the class of macrolides, previously found to increase longevity in mouse models, can serve as a therapeutic tool, to eliminate progerin, avoid farnesylated prelamin A accumulation, and restore chromatin dynamics in progeroid laminopathies.

Keywords

prelamin A, autophagy, protein degradation, laminopathies, progeria, Rapamycinprelamin A, autophagy, protein degradation, laminopathies, progeria, Rapamycin

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Submitted: 2011-07-12 01:45:33
Published: 2011-10-19 08:54:14
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Copyright (c) 2011 V. Cenni, C. Capanni, M. Columbaro, M. Ortolani, M.R. D'Apice, G. Novelli, M. Fini, S. Marmiroli, E. Scarano, N.M. Maraldi, S. Squarzoni, S. Prencipe, G. Lattanzi

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