Determination of cell fate in skeletal muscle following BMP gene transfer by in vivo electroporation

  • Mariko Kawai | kawai-m@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp Osaka Dental University, Japan.
  • Yu-Ki Ohmori Dental School Okayama University, Japan.
  • Mai Nishino Dental School Okayama University, Japan.
  • Masayo Yoshida Dental School Okayama University, Japan.
  • Kaori Tabata Dental School Okayama University, Japan.
  • Do-Saku Hirota Dental School Okayama University, Japan.
  • Ayako Ryu-Mon Dental School Okayama University, Japan.
  • Hiromitsu Yamamoto Kyoto University, Japan.
  • Junya Sonobe Kyoto University, Japan.
  • Yo-Hei Kataoka Okayama University, Japan.
  • Noriko Shiotsu Okayama University, Japan.
  • Mika Ikegame Okayama University, Japan.
  • Hiroki Maruyama Niigata University, Japan.
  • Toshio Yamamoto Okayama University, Japan.
  • Kazuhisa Bessho Kyoto University, Japan.
  • Kiyoshi Ohura Osaka Dental University, Japan.

Abstract

We previously developed a novel method for gene transfer, which combined a non-viral gene expression vector with transcutaneous in vivo electroporation. We applied this method to transfer the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) gene and induce ectopic bone formation in rat skeletal muscles. At present, it remains unclear which types of cells can differentiate into osteogenic cells after BMP gene transfer by in vivo electroporation. Two types of stem cells in skeletal muscle can differentiate into osteogenic cells: muscle-derived stem cells, and bone marrow-derived stem cells in the blood. In the present study, we transferred the BMP gene into rat skeletal muscles. We then stained tissues for several muscle-derived stem cell markers (e.g., Pax7, M-cadherin), muscle regeneration-related markers (e.g., Myod1, myogenin), and an inflammatory cell marker (CD68) to follow cell differentiation over time. Our results indicate that, in the absence of BMP, the cell population undergoes muscle regeneration, whereas in its presence, it can differentiate into osteogenic cells. Commitment towards either muscle regeneration or induction of ectopic bone formation appears to occur five to seven days after BMP gene transfer.

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Published
2017-05-05
Section
Original Papers
Keywords:
Cell fate, skeletal muscle, BMP, gene transfer, in vivo electroporation.
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How to Cite
Kawai, M., Ohmori, Y.-K., Nishino, M., Yoshida, M., Tabata, K., Hirota, D.-S., Ryu-Mon, A., Yamamoto, H., Sonobe, J., Kataoka, Y.-H., Shiotsu, N., Ikegame, M., Maruyama, H., Yamamoto, T., Bessho, K., & Ohura, K. (2017). Determination of cell fate in skeletal muscle following BMP gene transfer by in vivo electroporation. European Journal of Histochemistry, 61(2). https://doi.org/10.4081/ejh.2017.2772